Filed Under Story

Women's Networks in an Unstable World

Case 3

Holata Merenciana was not alone in trying to navigate and knit together this diverse world. Collectively, Mocama, Yamasee, and Guale women responded to the pressures of Spanish missionary activities and English-sponsored slave raiding by forming a new network together. Among other things, they exchanged ideas about pottery styles. As a result, first the Mocamas and later the Yamasees adopted the pottery style of the Guales.

The world symbol (filfot) on this pottery offers a window into Native identities and cosmological beliefs. It is a modified version of the pre - contact symbol widely used across the Native South, featuring lines in the four cardinal directions with a central dot, representing the sun, this world, or both. Guale, Yamasee, and Mocama women continued to decorate pots with the world symbol design throughout the turbulent years of colonization. Despite Spanish missionaries’ efforts, they kept precontact religious beliefs.

Images

Case 3 Contents A photo of the following artifacts contained in this case: 1. A reconstructed pot excavated from the Mayport II Mound, renamed Atosi after the Mocama word for owl. The pot was excavated in the late 1960s or early 1970s by a local amateur group. The Atosi Mound was destroyed in the 1970s to make way for a 7-Eleven convenience store. Today it is the location of the Jacksonville Transportation Authority Park-n-Ride on the corner of State Road A1A and Wonderwood Drive. Generously donated by Dr. Keith Ashley, University of North Florida. 2. A replica of a paddle used to stamp pottery. The carved pattern is a modified filfot cross with the world symbol at the center. Replica created by Brian Floyd, artist and avoca - tional archaeologist. Generously funded through a Cummer Family Foundation grant awarded to the University of North Florida Archaeology Laboratory. 3. Three San Marcos pottery sherds stamped with the filfot cross and world symbol. Generously donated by Dr. Keith Ashley, University of North Florida. 4. Indigenous Mocama pottery excavated from the site of the Spanish mission San Pedro de Mocama. Generously donated by Dr. Keith Ashley, University of North Florida. Source: Department of Anthropology, University of North Florida Creator: Dr. Keith Ashley and Archaeology Students Date: 2020
Women's Networks in an Unstable World Panel This panel discusses the creation and maintenance of women's networks in a changing Indigenous world. Source: Department of History and Department of Anthropology, University of North Florida Creator: Dr. Denise Bossy, Dr. Keith Ashley, and University of North Florida students Date: 2020

Metadata

“Women's Networks in an Unstable World,” Indigenous Florida, accessed July 17, 2024, https://indigenousflorida.domains.unf.edu/items/show/82.