Filed Under Story

Technology and Pottery

Case 2

TECHNOLOGY
The Mocama used a variety of tools throughout their daily lives. Using handcrafted nets, seines, baskets, traps, and weirs, they captured large numbers of fish. Heavy whelk shells were used for cutting and pounding, and modified animal bones helped work hides and plant-based textiles. They altered animal bones and shells into decorative ornaments such as hairpins, beads, and pendants. Incised designs adorned some bone hairpins. They drank from ceremonial shells and used baskets made of palmetto fronds and reeds.

POTTERY
The Mocama made pottery using traditional construction techniques invented some 3000 years earlier. Their distinctive ceramic style included crushed pieces of pottery mixed into the local clays prior to firing. From this, they formed heavy-duty pots with thick walls, ideal for long-term cooking and simmering. Female potters decorated the exterior surfaces of these vessels with a range of simple designs. They developed a new decorative style, using kernel-less maize cobs to make impressions in the wet clay.

Images

Case 2 Contents A photo of two whelk shells which would have been used by Mocama artisans as tools. Source: Department of Anthropology, University of North Florida Creator: Dr. Keith Ashley (artifacts) Date: 2020
Case 2 Contents A photo of Mocama pottery beads and materials. Source: Department of Anthropology, University of North Florida Creator: Dr. Keith Ashley (artifacts) Date: 2020
Technology and Pottery Panel This panel describes Mocama technology and pottery techniques while also presenting artifacts. Source: Department of History and Department of Anthropology, University of North Florida Creator: Dr. Denise Bossy, Dr. Keith Ashley, and University of North Florida students. Date: 2020

Metadata

“Technology and Pottery,” Indigenous Florida, accessed July 17, 2024, https://indigenousflorida.domains.unf.edu/items/show/73.